Today Melissa will see between 30 and 35 patients (she’s in room #4). She’ll listen to their problems, order labs for them, meet a second time to discuss the lab results if needed, and prescribe medications, give instructions, or admit them to the hospital.November 19, 2015

November 19a, 2015

11/19/2015

This evening Melissa’s dad got to share from God’s Word at the prayer meeting that meets at the sewing school.November 18, 2015

11/18/2015

There are still parts of the hospital that are under construction. This is going to be a conference room for employee meetings and training. It’s being tiled this week and will soon have the ceiling, doors, and windows installed.november 17, 2015

11/17/2015

I guess it shouldn’t be surprising that each morning when we try to select the most urgent patients at the hospital’s entry many of the women complain of “all over body pain”. Just living is hard work for most people here. There’s wood to gather, crops to gather, crops to plant and tend, and the list goes on and most tasks are done without any sort of help from modern machinery.November 16, 2015

11/16/2015

This photo demands this caption… “My Cotton Pickin’ Wife”November 15, 2015

 

11/15/2015

The boys are enjoying their time with their grandparents. Today it’s building a long track for marbles in the kitchen…November 14, 2015

11/14/2015

Grandpa and Grandma have arrived in Mango with new toys.November 9, 2015

11/9/2015

November 8, 2015The past few days there have been demonstrations against the government here in Mango. The main road through Mango is the only route that goes from the port in Lomé to the countries above Togo. Part of the demonstration meant that the road through town was barricaded. Unfortunately, a few people have lost their lives in the midst of the demonstrations. We are safe and we do not feel at all threatened. We are not a part of this conflict and the people of Mango love our work and I believe they would make every effort to keep us safe. The conflict is a mired in the politics from many years in the past. In short, the president had declared an order to create a wildlife park near Mango and the people revolted. As of right now he has rescinded his order to create a wildlife park and things seem to be getting back to normal. There were nearly 60 people arrested during the protests with some of them being school aged children. Many have been released, and as long as the rest are released as promised this conflict may be over for now.

Thirty or forty years ago those in authority did have an animal reserve in this area that was very strictly enforced. While the government officials would come and hunt and have large parties, the residents of Mango suffered. There are stories of government officials entering peoples’ homes and demanding to see proof of the type of meat that was in a pan of sauce. If the person could not show proof (such as chicken feathers) that the meat came from a domestic animal they would be punished. There are also many brutal stories of people who were caught fishing in areas deemed part of the reserve and they were punished by being put into a net and hung from a helicopter. People claim that police would stop cars and if there was blood found on the tires from possibly killing an animal on the road they were beaten or otherwise punished. At the same time animals were protected to the point that it was illegal to kill or damage an animal in any way regardless of whether one’s life, crop, or family was in danger. When the reserve was lifted in the past people quickly killed every possible animal and have planted fields in much of this area and established villages in the area that was part of the reserve. Now with word that a new reserve is being proposed, people remember the brutality that they suffered less than 30 years ago are willing to fight to make sure the same things do not return.

11/8/2015

Today I grabbed Aden and we headed to the schoolhouse to eat our lunch with the other missionary kids and we even had a little entertainment while we ate…September 26b, 2015

10/26/2015

 

Here’s a link to our latest family update… Click HereSeptember 26, 2015

10/25/2015

The second owl was caught in the maintenance building and since the last owl they caught was made into some sort of sauce to be eaten over rice we took pity on this one and asked the workers if we could take it for a drive and release it far from the hospital. According to the workers the last owl was very tough and stringy (in case you’re thinking about eating an owl) so they didn’t seem too sad to see this one go for a ride.September 24, 2015

10/24/2015

I saw another truckload of prayer mats that was so tall that there was a permanent person who rode on top to life power lines over the truck as it passed under. These prayer mats arrive at the port in Lomé and are trucked into the northern countries of West Africa.October 25, 2015

10/22/2015

In case you thought your neighborhood school was underfunded, this is public school in a small village not far from the hospital. October 21, 2015

Here’s a look inside of the two classrooms…October 21a, 2015

October 21b, 2015

10/21/2015

September 25a, 2015

10/18/2015

With the rains coming less and less frequently and the temperatures beginning to climb, growing seasons are coming to an end and it’s time for harvesting crops. October 17, 2015

10/17/2015